CITRAL Seminars and Workshops

UC Santa Barbara has many different kinds of faculty: researchers, lecturers, librarians, postdocs, part-timers, academic coordinators, and graduate student TAs. CITRAL is a hub for all faculty, regardless of title, to come together on issues connected with teaching and learning.

Join our listserv to keep up to date on upcoming workshops, activities, lunchtime discussions, and more!

Course/faculty consultation

Got a great idea? Want to work through a thorny teaching or learning issue? CITRAL is here for individual faculty consultations. Contact Linda Adler-Kassner, Faculty Director, to schedule a time to talk!

 

Join a CITRAL Workshop! Review the list below or individual program pages. Workshops are added frequently!

 

 

Talk Matters: Investigating the Nature of Non-Content Classroom Language – Instructor Talk – that May Mediate Student Inclusion, Engagement, and Learning with Dr. Kimberly Tanner

Date: TBA

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Through the language they use, instructors create classroom environments that have the potential to impact learning by affecting student motivation, resistance, belonging, and self-efficacy. However, despite the critical importance of instructor language to the student experience, little research has investigated what instructors are saying in undergraduate classrooms. We have systematically investigated instructor language that was not directly relate to content and defined this as Instructor Talk. Analyzing language from more than 60 courses, we have identified five robust categories of Instructor Talk that can characterize ~90% of non-content language observed to date. The remaining ~10% of instances of Instructor Talk were categorized as negatively-phrased and potentially discouraging to students. Individual participants will have the opportunity to examine and categorize Instructor Talk, as well as strategize about analyzing Instructor Talk from their own practice.
 
Kimberly Tanner, PhD, is a Professor of Biology at SFSU and the Director of SEPAL. Her research group, SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory, is interested in how people learn science, especially biology, and how teachers and scientists can collaborate to make science teaching and learning in classrooms more like how scientists work. SEPAL researchers are studying a variety of issues in biology education and science education, with a special emphasis on developing novel assessment tools to better understand how people from children to practicing scientists conceptualize the biological and physical world.

RSVP at bit.ly/TalkMattersW20

 

Order Matters: Becoming Metacognitive about Teaching Choices and Aligning Teaching with How the Brain Learns with Dr. Kimberly Tanner

Date: TBA

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What teaching choices are we making as instructors, and why? How do we as instructors decide how to spend in-class time with students? To what extent do our teaching plans align with what is known about how the brain learns? What tools are available to become more analytical about our teaching choices and strategize for change? In this interactive workshop, participants will explore their current approaches to planning and reflecting on their teaching, as well as explore the 5E learning cycle model as an analytical tool for understanding teaching choices. Individual participants will have the opportunity to self-assess and analyze current class sessions and identify changes that could be immediately implemented.
 
Kimberly Tanner, PhD, is a Professor of Biology at SFSU and the Director of SEPAL. Her research group, SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory, is interested in how people learn science, especially biology, and how teachers and scientists can collaborate to make science teaching and learning in classrooms more like how scientists work. SEPAL researchers are studying a variety of issues in biology education and science education, with a special emphasis on developing novel assessment tools to better understand how people from children to practicing scientists conceptualize the biological and physical world.

RSVP at bit.ly/OrderMattersW20

 

GE Assessment Workshop

Date: TBA

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Facilitators:
Linda Adler-Kassner,
Faculty Director, CITRAL and lead investigator
Laurel Wilder, Associate Director, Institutional Research
Josh Kuntzman, UCSB Assessment Coordinator
Amanda Brey, Director, Program Review/former assessment analyst)
Danny Katz, Ph.D. candidate, GGSE and graduate student lead
 
Do you wonder:
  • What do students learn in GE courses?
  • Does learning develop through the course of the GE program?
  • What do students take away from GE courses?
  • How can I improve my GE course … without adding to my workload?
Come learn about responses to some of these questions.
 
Join the UCSB assessment team to discuss findings from year 2 of a longitudinal study of UCSB’s general education program* and to learn more about pedagogical activity that can support the goals of instructors teaching GE courses.
 
Attendees in this highly interactive session will learn about
  • To what extent students find that GE courses help them understand the goals of the GE program
  • How faculty and student ratings of GE assignments/artifacts compare 
  • What aspects of the GE Area learning outcomes correlate most highly with highly rated student work 
  • How instructors can build in low-workload activities to support strong student performance
  • …and more! 
Attendees who RSVP in advance will receive a detailed summary of the year 2 study results for the GE areas in which they teach.
 
*The GE study has followed over 300 UCSB students through each quarter of their GE courses beginning in Fall 2016. Each quarter, students who elect to participate submit one work sample  from a GE course selected by UCSB Institutional Research. Students complete a survey that asks them how they think the course achieved the overall goals for the GE program and how they think a specific sample of their own work in the course demonstrates what they’ve learned about a particular GE learning outcome. Faculty rate the same student work sample in relation to the same GE learning outcome. The results provide evidence to compare student and faculty understandings and assessments of the GE outcomes and the GE program.

RSVP at tinyurl.com/GEAssessment

 

Disciplinary Knowledge: How to Teach Students Knowledge-Making in Your Discipline

Date: TBA

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Facilitator: Linda Adler-Kassner

In university courses, learning is always situated within one or more disciplines. This workshop invites you to view your own discipline in ways that help you articulate and teach it to students. We’ll explore: what kinds of questions are asked, what evidence or data are collected, how the evidence or data are interpreted, and how knowledge is represented? And how do these look different across courses?. Working with others in the session, you’ll learn language, strategies, and activities that will be useful within specific classes and across departments.

Please read “​How Experts Differ from Novices​” and “Communities of Practice​” prior to the session. You can find the readings in the​ ​Box folder​ for the workshops.

 

 

Representational Knowledge: Designing and Improving Writing Assignments and Commenting on Student Writing

Date: TBA

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FacilitatorJosh Kuntzman

Writing (whether producing papers, equations, or short exam responses) is one of the primary ways that students are expected to demonstrate their learning. Writing can also help students learn in any course. This session will focus on how you can help students get the most out of writing assignments in your discipline. It will provide you with strategies to make your commenting practices more effective, efficient, and enjoyable.

Please bring: 1) an assignment from an undergraduate course; and 2) a piece of good student writing from an undergraduate course OR a journal article from your discipline to the workshop.

 

 

Learning Knowledge: Backward Design and Transparent Teaching

Date: TBA

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FacilitatorElina Salminen

Thinking about learning can be transformative for instructors and learners. In this workshop, we’ll focus on two powerful metacognitive frameworks that foster thoughtful learning for both you and your students: backward design and transparent teaching. You’ll work on developing clear structures and activities that enable students to move from practice to performance, placing learning goals at the center of your teaching and making them transparent in your assignments and activities. This workshop provides strategies that you can use when teaching sections or when designing your own courses.

We recommend you come prepared to focus on a specific course or section and bring available materials (syllabus, section plan, assignments) with you to the session.

 

 

Empathetic Knowledge: Connecting with Students During Office Hours and Beyond

Date: TBA

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FacilitatorMaggie Safronova

In this session we will discuss how students’ identities, experiences, and interests inform their learning and how an awareness of diverse experiences can inform a more inclusive learning environment. We’ll explore strategies you can use to get to know your students and structures you can create to cultivate relationships with students that encourage growth, welcome people from diverse backgrounds, and set healthy boundaries.